Fun Stuff

the Dude

Posted on Jun 29, 2016 in Fun Stuff

June 25, 2016: Just got this letter (hey, what were you dudes waiting for?), for the enlightenment of all you achievers out there

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Adafruit Interview with Paul

Posted on May 30, 2015 in Fun Stuff

On May 22nd, Paul and his intrepid side-kick Maggie took a train to NYC to visit Adafruit.  Unfortunately, Winfield, though there in spirit, had an HVAC emergency that day and couldn’t join them.  After a tour of the facilities and meeting a lot of very nice and happy people, Paul sat down for an interview with Ladyada (linked above). You may have noticed that Limor “Ladyada” Fried, who founded Adafruit along with her partner Phil, was among those quoted on the third edition cover, alongside stalwarts such as Jim Williams, Walt Jung, and John Willison.  Given that the aim of the book is to help anyone learn the art of electronics, the authors have a keen interest in what’s happening in popular electronics and the new maker movement.  The hobbyist electronics scene had something of a decline through the 80’s and 90’s, likely owing to the rise of impenetrable manufactured electronics goods, but the maker movement has re-energized peoples’ enthusiasm for learning and building again, including and especially electronics. That’s why we visited Adafruit and why we enjoy watching the enthusiasm that’s sown by people like Dave Jones, Sparkfun, Element14, Make, and others.  And, of course, by Adafruit, who are not just selling Arduinos and LEDs, but designing and manufacturing their own devices to bridge gaps and help their customers enter the world of making.  They provide tutorials, data sheets, and insight into the art of electronics that helps people learn at their own pace.  Whether it’s simply learning to solder, learning to build circuits from scratch, or teaching kids about electricity and setting them on the path to becoming makers themselves, Adafruit has made the hobbyist’s needs and desires their mission.  That’s really exciting to watch. As a result, the authors were enthusiastic about the idea of visiting Adafruit and doing an interview about the book.  AoE may have started as a textbook for a university course, but it has evolved and become an essential source for anyone, from professional circuit designers to lone hobbyists, to explore and master the art of electronics.  Thanks to Adafruit for letting us share our enthusiasm for this concept with the...

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Jason’s unboxing

Posted on Apr 7, 2015 in Fun Stuff

Jason’s unboxing

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AoE lands in Australia

Posted on Mar 27, 2015 in Fun Stuff, News

EEVblog.com strikes again, check it out!: www.eevblog.com/2015/03/26/the-art-of-electronics-3rd-edition/

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Publisher’s Letterhead

Posted on Mar 17, 2015 in Fun Stuff

Publisher’s Letterhead

Cambridge University Press has been around for a while. Check out their impressive...

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Prehistory of The Art of Electronics

Posted on Mar 17, 2015 in Fun Stuff

The Art of Electronics started life as a set of notes for an electronics course, Physics 123, taught in the Physics Department at Harvard University since 1974.  We chose this course number because we wanted to teach “all of electronics” in one semester — that is, “1-2-3 Electronics”. We first tried a few textbooks, of the “electronics for scientists” variety, but were unhappy with them all.  None seemed to offer the intuitive “back-of-the-envelope” approach to electronic design — that we favor.  So we started writing (literally: in pencil, on paper, by hand) a set of “notes”.  (click here for a sample page, and here for the 1970’s-era table of contents.)  These grew to some 200 pages, and acquired considerable popularity. People wanted copies, even if they weren’t taking the course. After xeroxing a few hundred copies, we decided that there was a need for a real book, one that explained how real circuit designers design circuits. The scope of The Book (as we called it) grew enormously, with a large-format first edition of some 700 pages, extended to more than 1100 pages, 1000 figures, and 80 tables in the second edition, and to more than 1220 pages, 1500 figures, 50 photographs, 80 tables, and 90 oscilloscope screen-captures in the third...

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Hoist the Jolly Roger

Posted on Mar 17, 2015 in Fun Stuff

Hoist the Jolly Roger

The worldwide Art of Electronics food chain includes various inexpensive editions, printed (with publisher’s permission) locally on gritty brownish-gray “paper.” It also includes an occasional fully ripped-off edition, in apparent violation of copyright etiquette. Check out former President Marcos’ interest in electronics, formalized in a Presidential Decree printed in an old Phillipine edition of the book: Apparently this sort of activity was OK over there, as long as you didn’t take these books out of the...

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Editorial Hindsight

Posted on Mar 17, 2015 in Fun Stuff

Editorial Hindsight

Acquisition editors of major book publishers aren’t exactly famous for taking chances, especially on new authors. We learned this the hard way. Here, for example, is a typical letter we got when we were looking for a publisher for a book that, in retrospect, has made publishing history:     Interestingly, these same editors show some serious enthusiasm just a few years after publication:...

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The Ultimate Nerdwear

Posted on Mar 17, 2015 in Fun Stuff

The Ultimate Nerdwear

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Unusual Uses of the Book

Posted on Mar 17, 2015 in Fun Stuff

Unusual Uses of the Book

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